lefttop neu
test
hardware

                                                         

THE DEAD BROTHERS - black moose

VR1285



TRACKLIST
1. BLACK MOOSE
2. THERE'S ALWAYS SOMEONE THAT YOU OWE
3. DARK NIGHT
4. GOOD LUCK
5. I'M SO LONESOME I COULD CRY
6. BLACK TRAIN
7. ST DYMPHNA
8. LA MAUVAISE RÉPUTATION
9. HEART OF STONE
10. FEMME FATALE
11. SO WARS, SO ISTS UND SO WIRDS BLEIBEN
12. SHIP OF FOOLS
13. APPENZELLER TANZ
THE DEAD BROTHERS 'black moose'
LP: VR1285 EAN-CODE: 7640148980449
CD: VRCD85 EAN-CODE: 7640148980524
MC: VRMC85 EAN-CODE: 7640148982207
ORDER

ENGLISH
After the Foundation in 1989 and the Commercial Breakthrough with 'WUNDERKAMMER' (2006) and a dramatic Change in 2010 (5th SIN-PHONIE) with the probably world Darkest and most Deadly Funeral String Orchestra the World has seen , the DEAD BROTHERS ,around Puppet Master of Disaster and Nr1 Swiss-Armenian Madman Alain Croubalian took another Step into the Unexpected Wonderland of Exotica Dark Country Folk and Deadly Strings with some rotten Back pipes and Recorded at the Famous OUTSIDE INSIDE STUDIOS in Italy a Album that takes you into the World of the BLACK MOOSE , a mystical Creature that has been there before the dawn of man a Creature that has witnessed the demise of millenia of civilizations and that is perhaps the driving force behind our perpetual fall into the proverbial dark night of the soul. a trueblues clash with Swiss psycho folklore and medieval troubadours high on ayahuasca. Black Moose is a romantic record - romantic in the darkest sense possible, a record that sheds new light on the ancient notion that all beauty emerges out of pain. Where does Friedrich Nietzsche meet central American revolutionaries and criminal bards drinking pisco sours made of kerosene with the devil himself






DEUTSCH
SIE HABEN NICHT EINFACH EINE NEUE PLATTE AUFGENOMMEN - SIE HABEN EINE NEUE WELT GESCHAFFEN
Nach der Gründung 1989 und dem Kommerziellen Durchbruch mit 'WUNDERKAMMER' (2006) und der Neuerfindung ihres Seins (5th SIN-PHONIE) 2010 zusammen mit dem wohl Dunkelsten und Tödlichstem Streicher Orchester die Welt je gesehen hat, versammelten sich die Toten Brüder um den Meister Des Chaos und Nr1 Schweiz-Armenischem Enfant Terrible Alain Croubalian und machen einen erneuten Grossen Schritt in Eine Exotisch von Dunkler Country Musik Blues und Schweizer Folklore mit Dudelsack und Rock'n'roll geprägter Musik in Richtung Niemands Land wo der BLACK MOOSE ( Schwarzer Elch) haust, einer mysischen Figur die noch vor Morgengrauen der menschheit da war, die der zusammenbruch der zivilisation mit erlebt hat und sich in den dunkelsten Winkel des menschlichen bewusstsein aufhält.
Das Album Black Moose ist ein Romantisches Album, Romantisch im Dunkelstem Sinne des Wortes mit einem Tödlichen Ende es Verbindet den Amerikanischen mit dem Afrikanischen Blues lässt Schweizer Volksmusik zusammen mit Dudelsäcken in tiefste Ambründe Stürzen und bringt dich dort hin wo sich Friedrich Nietzsche mit den Revolutionären Führern der Central Amerikanern Revolution in einer Hafen Bar zu einem Pisco Sour mit Kerosin an einem Tisch mit dem Teufel Trifft




 


REVIEWS:


OUSET-FRANCE (FR)
Noces funèbres Country-blues. Imaginez la fin d'un banquet en phase digestive. L'orchestre a aussi mangé et bu. Cuivres et cordes sont de sortie. C'est le mariage  du folk-blues US et du baloche des Balkans. Où plutôt un enterrement. The Dead brothers ont le chic pour miner le joyeux et célébrer le triste. Noir mais beau. En allemand, français ou anglais, ces Suisses sont romantiques à souhait. Ils assurent le grand écart en reprenant I'm so lonesome I could cry de Hank Williams, La mauvaise réputation de Brassens, une danse suisse traditionnelle du XVIIIe siècle et un bon vieux rockabilly.

Christian Gasser empfiehlt (CH)

Quicklebendige Untote
Sie sind schon tot? Leben sie noch? Oder sind sie einfach untot? Die Karriere des selbsternannten Beerdigungsorchesters The Dead Brothers ist wechselhaft, und immer wenn man schon befürchtet, sie hätten endgültig das Zeitliche gesegnet, überraschen sie die Welt mit einem neuen Lebenszeichen. "Black Moose", das sechste Album des Sextetts um Dead Alain Croubalian, ist ein betörender Wurf von tiefer und dunkler Romantik, gleichzeitig durchtränkt von schwarzem Humor. Neu erfunden haben sich die toten Brüder nicht: Sie spielen auf Akkordeon, Drehleier, Maultrommel, Banjo, Mandoline, Harmonium, Wald- und Halazither, Pauken und Violinen swingende und schwankende, rumpelnde und rollende Songs – manchmal countryesk, manchmal latinoschnulzig oder gar appenzellerisch hopsend, auf englisch, französisch und schweizerdeutsch, oft tränenselig, dann wieder (floh-)zirkusmässig fröhlich, immer theatralisch und vor allem mit einem gehörigen Schuss New-Orleans-Voodoo gewürzt, der die bleichen Knochen klappern lässt, dass es eine wahre Freude ist. Dead Alain singt und schmachtet meistens in ein Megaphon, was seiner Stimme dieses schön grabesmässige, aber nie wirklich gruslige Röcheln verleiht. Man wundert sich, warum diese Beerdigungskombo weit lebendiger klingt als viele selbsternannte Partybands. Liegt es daran, dass die fünf ausgebufften Charmeure trotz ihrer trashigen Tristesse grossartige Entertainer sind, in deren Show Morbidität und Humor sich die Waage halten? Vielleicht hat das auch nur damit zu tun, dass, in New Orleans zumindest, die wildeste und lebenbejahendste Musik gleich nach dem Trauermarsch gespielt wird, auf dem Weg vom Friedhof zurück in die Stadt.  The Dead Brothers: "Black Moose" (Voodoo Rhythm)

THE NATIONAL EXAMINER (USA)
The Dead Brothers are one of those diverse and highly original bands one comes across too rarely in today's music. This fact, along with the fact that they have only released six albums in the last fourteen years, makes them quite valuable to music enthusiasts the world over, especially those whose tastes lay a good distance outside of the mainstream. Black Moose, The Dead Brothers' brand new thirteen-song album on Voodoo Rhythm Records certainly goes toward proving this even more. And like the band's previous releases, Black Moose doesn't disappoint. Nor does it just expand upon their already well-established sound; it forges new roads through the strange musical wildernesses and mad wastelands of death blues, funeral trash, gypsy-folk, dark roots, outsider rock'n'roll, and...well, that inimitable thing that belongs solely to The Dead Brothers and can only be labeled as such. New album by The Dead Brothers courtesy of Voodoo Rhythm Records
The album opens with the title track. "Black Moose" is an arrangement of strings, jaw harp, tuba, and percussion over which The Dead Brothers' frontman Alain Croubalian sings, taking the listener on a journey through the dark history of man and the affliction of the human condition with which he has always been plagued to one degree or another; all significant events passing with one constant: a black presence casting its substantial shadow over it all. "Dark Night," which would probably appeal to fans of Peter Murphy's Carver Combo, has a slow gypsy folk and apocalyptic tango feel to it, marked by the sulfur stink of hellfire and what the vocals refer to as the dark night of the soul. "I'm So Lonesome I Could Cry" is a sparse acoustic song that reminds me somewhat of Those Poor Bastards. "Black Train" is a roosty song built on rockabilly done Dead Brothers style. And "Ship of Fools" is an atmospheric piece in the dawn of the album, where Dead Alain sings as it floats on to its destination.
Black Moose, the follow-up to The Dead Brothers 2010 album 5th Sin-Phonie, lies at the crossroads where poetry and philosophy intersect, and where a number of other things meet, such as superstition and fact, the natural and supernatural, darkness and light, intellect and emotion, the lamb and the lion, the living and the dead. And because of its musical composition and engaging lyrical content, it would not be at all surprising if fans declared it their favorite Dead Brothers release to date.

PSYCHELIC FOLK (NL)
It has been a while since I have reviewed any of the more recent releases of this label. One of the reasons is simply because lots of releases are electric entertainment like Punk, Blues Trash or Rockabilly, sometimes Cajun, only just now and then we have a project or band who spans a couple of more styles and have roots in folk and expresses it beyond genres, which catches my interest. Even though The Dead Brothers still fits within the label's parameters, playing for the entertainment, having an underground aggressive trash-feel, they have a touch of blues singing, use here and there bluegrass rhythm or a Cajun violin, and someway hidden play this with a touch of humour, hidden behind a dark corner of the eye. This must only have been released some day or another on the label.
On their Facebook page they say they play Funeral rock'n roll. On the label they call it "country blues Swiss psycho folk with oriental deadly strings and rotten bag pipes." This is already the fifth record on the label, but it's the first one I hear. The Dead Brothers have a long history since 1993 with more than 30 members during its existence. Under the guidance of Alain Croubalian, they started playing just gospel songs, those sung by Elvis. Soon adding two tubas while founding member Jean-Philippe Geiser played Bo Diddley beats on his big horn. The band turned more into a circus. The Electric Circus featured the idea that musicians replaced animals and jugglers. From that moment they were a mega combo with three tubas, 9 other horns and a puppet dancing, a folk guitar symphony orchestra, and a trash folk banjo and accordion duo with ten members reproducing Kurt Weill's arrangements, some three old acoustic Armenians sitting on chairs, a summer piano cabaret band with slide guitar and fiddle... never knowing beforehand when they were about to pop up. From 1998 onwards they started mixing Gipsy Music with Blues Rock'n'roll and Delinquent Jazz. At that stage they called themselves the Only Real Heavy Metal Band. By now, the band re-injects power into their folk, trash, blues, footstomp tuba etc. core, add a touch of hilliebillie, bluegrass as well, but also touches medieval music or a touch of Leonard Cohen. Not too many tracks sound similar. It is as if many songwriters and singers were involved.
The first track, the title track, shows an energetic happy footstomping/hand clapping rhythm with the sharp contrasts of banjo, jew's harp, trombone, bagpipe and hurdy-gurdy mixed with ordinary dark matters blues singing, and with some worked conclusive out vocal harmonies here and there. The folk footstomping continues in the next track, with folk violin, banjo and sousaphone-like tuba. The voice is electrified this time the track sounds like a sailor song singing its ass out, on shore. The next track, accompanied by a subtle barrel organ rhythm, some slow electric guitar and other echoing percussive textures shows a lead voice like Leonard Cohen, with additional deep voice harmonies. Also this is a song like that of a drunken and broke sailor who sings his life story when all others were already passed out. I am sure the cats will flee when such a song is sung. "Good Luck" is a very small and still tragic bagpipe intermezzo. "I am so lonesome I could cry" (Hank Williams) is sung with a low voice too, accompanied by acoustic picking only. It is more a lonely country blues song. "Black Train" imitates the train feeling with echoing and sliding guitars and with trash blues hilliebillie-rock'n roll rhythms. "St Dymhna" is a softer acoustic song with some dual harmonies, acoustic pickings and harmonium-alike accordion.  This is followed by a French song, which is accompanied by an odd buzzy accordion-alike sound of electric organ and some violin. "Heart Of Stone" starts with an oriental tune on banjo, but then turning to a kind of sing along traditional folk blues (violins, banjo).  "Femme Fatale" is a more uptempo folk blues stomper. We hear banjos and hurdy-gurdy mostly.  The next track sounds more like French folk, with accordion rhythm lead and hurdy-gurdy harmonies, it is sung in Swiss German. "Ship Of Fools" features a low voice again, the mode is simple blues with a certain darkness from inside. An organ and two slow electric guitars play the rhythm and a distorted almost sliding texture. The last conclusive track is an old folk dance rhythm on violin, with tuba rhythm and banjo rhythms.
Even though the songs and its setting have often nothing too complicated, there still are so many elements involved that this could easily provoke the setting of a theatre in which these songs appear. I can imagine a folk bar near the shore where sailors cry their heart out before getting back at the last minute in the morning to their ships. It could fit as the expression of a worker man's blues after a tough life during daylight. Not that it is that serious, it still is that dark and so much compensating all in a nightlife's vision.

Flight 13 (DE)
Die toten Brüder ziehen wieder durchs Niemandsland. Abgründe tun sich auch auf dem neuesten Album der Band um den Meister des Chaos und das schweizerisch-armenische Enfant Terrible Alain Croubalian. Der Teufel sitzt irgendwie immer mit am Tisch bei Songs, in denen afrikanischer und amerikanischer Blues auf die Melancholie des Balkan treffen, in denen Maultrommel, Banjo, Tuba, Fidel oder gar Schweizer Dudelsack auf verzweifelt-anklagend-bedauernde Gesänge treffen und der Rock´n Roll hinter der Tür wartet. Die Nächte sind stockfinster in den düstersten Ecken dieser Lieder für die abgeranzte Hafenbar oder die abgelegene Bergspelunke am See. Tragik ist dabei der Bruder im Geiste. Und die Portraits von Kurt Weill, Friedrich Nietzsche, Tom Waits und den Revoluzzer der Outlaw Legends hängen an der Wand. *Voodoo Rhythm


ROCK À LA CASBAH (FR)
On a tous en tête ce tableau de Goya dans lequel Saturne dévore sauvagement ses enfants. Alain croubalian et les Dead Brother sont tout aussi voraces.  Dead Brothers, projet protéiforme, a déjà consommé plus d'une vingtaine de musiciens depuis 1998. Ce turnover explique la richesse folle de Black Moose sur Voodoo Rhythm Records notre disque vedette. Nous dévorerons dans cette émission un peu de Grand Blanc, du stag O les Records (nouvelles compile inouïe), une pontiak et du Goat.

RADIO DREIECKLAND (DE)
THE DEAD BROTHERS, «the greatest and strangest funeral combo of the world». Sie haben eine neue Platte aufgenommen: BLACK MOOSE. Zu hören ist Original «The Dead Brothers»-Avantgarde Folk, Tanzmusik aus dem Appenzeller Land, French Punk und Rock'n'Roll. INSIDE THE BLACK APPLE ist der Titel ihrer neuen Konzertperformance, die erstmalig von Regisseur Tom Schneider inszeniert wird. Wir erleben, hören, sehen die Geschichte des alpinen Punk Rock Vol. 1. Vom Theater Neumarkt ziehen die Dead Brothers auf Tour durch die Schweiz, Österreich, Frankreich, Spanien: «Welcome to the dark side of the black apple. Folklore lehnt sich auf gegen internationale Gleichmacherei. Historische Avantgarde-Techniken kriechen in den black apple, Ur-Science-Fiction lädt die Gehirne neu auf. We swear over dark Switzerland.»

BADISCHE ZEITUNG (DE)
Freiburger Regisseur Tom Schneider inszeniert die Konzertperformance von The Dead Brothers
The Dead Brothers sind anscheinend die Frühaufsteher unter den Bands. Geprobt wird ab 9.30 Uhr, davor hat Tom Schneider noch Zeit für ein Pressegespräch. Ist Musikmachen neuerdings ein Nine-to-five-job? Ja, wenn Musiker Kinder bekommen. Auf der Friedrichstraße fließt der Verkehr, in der Nummer 58 fänden Arbeitssoziologen ein fruchtbares Feld. Längst obsolet gewordene Verordnungen über Gefahrengut kleben an der Wand. Die winzigen Büros an der Seite sind verglast und mit Türen und Durchreichen verbunden. Der Geist der Disziplin ist noch immer um die verlassenen Räume, in die vorübergehend die Kulturliste eingezogen ist. Man muss sich an diesem Ort einmal sehr kontrolliert gefühlt haben. Fast komisch, dass ausgerechnet hier jetzt nach dem Lustprinzip gearbeitet wird.
Seit kurzem hat sich die frisch fusionierte freie Gruppe off deluxe im Keller einquartiert. Auf 140 Quadratmetern wird geprobt. Es war eine schlanke Fusion. Weder Tom Schneiders Tanz- und Theater-Kollektiv Snap deluxe noch Tobias Ergenzingers Off the record group haben ein eigenes Ensemble. Auch wenn beide häufig in festen Konstellationen arbeiten. Tom Schneider ist ein Gruppenmensch. Mit Harmonie muss man das nicht verwechseln. "Wir reiben uns aneinander", beschreibt Schneider die Zusammenarbeit mit Ergenzinger und benennt zugleich ein Manko: "In der freien Szene findet zu wenig gemeinsam statt". In Freiburg waren seine Inszenierungen außer im Theater Freiburg im Kunstverein oder dem Wiehrebahnhof zu sehen. Die Orte beschreiben eine Suche nach Freiräumen. "Es gibt einfach nicht sehr viele Aufführungsmöglichkeiten in Freiburg, und zugleich ist alles sehr durchstrukturiert", schildert Tom Schneider die Bedingungen, die er in der freien Szene vorgefunden hat.

Werbung
Versucht man das Feld zu fassen, in dem der 47-Jährige arbeitet, kommt man jedoch unweigerlich auf andere zu sprechen. Auf Joachim Schloemer, den er während seiner Regieassistenz in Basel in den Nullerjahren kennen lernte und dem er 2006 nach Freiburg folgte, um hier pvc Tanz Freiburg Heidelberg aufzubauen, auf Sebastian Nübling, in dessen Produktion "Mütter. Väter. Kinder" er mit seiner Frau, der Tänzerin Alice Gartenschläger und Sohn Yoel auftrat.

Die Anarchie als Wurzel der Volksmusik
Auf Sandra Hüller, die mit Alice Gartenschläger im November an den Münchner Kammerspielen in Schneiders neuer Produktion "À corps perdu" Premiere haben wird, und auf den Musiker Alain Croubalian, mit dem er mehrfach zusammen gearbeitet hat und der zuletzt in "Das Beste kommt noch" einer nicht zu stillenden Sehnsucht sein Gesicht gab. "Inside the black apple", die gemeinsame Konzertperformance, wurde mit dem Zürcher Theater Neumarkt koproduziert. Schneiders Kontakte führen an feste Häuser und in die freie Szene, nicht selten zu Künstlern, die wie er nicht viel auf die Grenzen zwischen den Sparten geben.
Tom Schneider ist mehr Macher als Manager. Die sechsköpfige selbst ernannte Begräbnisband "The Dead Brothers" aus der Schweiz ins Crash nach Freiburg zu holen, war für ihn auch eine Frage der eigenen Sichtbarkeit. Die erste eigentliche Produktion von off deluxe wird erst im Dezember im E-Werk Premiere haben. Seine Rolle als Regisseur bei "Inside the black apple" sieht er vor allem darin, einen Bogen zu schaffen zwischen den Songs von Alain Croubalian. Und Bilder für diese zu entwerfen, auch in Zusammenarbeit mit Kostümbildnerin Franziska Jacobsen.
Das dürfte ihm liegen, Schneiders Inszenierungen setzten bisher weder auf stringent erzählte Geschichten noch die Psychologie der Figuren, sie sind auf eine atmosphärische Weise musikalisch, Croubalian hingegen ist ein Geschichtenerzähler. Der Schweizer mit dem armenischen Namen spielt Banjo und Gitarre auf der Bühne. Er ist niemand, der auf der Suche nach dem Blues wäre, er hat ihn gefunden. Überall dort, wo das Leben herzergreifend und ein wenig schäbig ist; im französischen Chanson, auf dem Balkan und natürlich bei Tom Waits. "Rock 'n' Roll mit merklichen Anteilen Schweizer Volksmusik und ein bisschen Performance", so charakterisiert Tom Schneider die Musik von The Dead Brothers, die sich gerade neu formiert und mit "Black Moose" auch ein neues Album herausgebracht haben. Fest steht nur, The Dead Brothers legen die Wurzel der Volksmusik frei: die Anarchie.
– The Dead Brothers. Inside the black apple. Konzertperformance, heute, 2. Oktober, 21.30 Uhr, Crash, Freiburg, Schnewlinstraße 7.

TRESPASS (CH)
Die Extravaganz haben sich The Dead Brothers rund um den "Nr. 1-armenisch-schweizerischen" Frontmann Alain Courbalian nicht nur musikalisch zum Stil erkoren. Alles rund um die Band - inklusive der Wortwahl in der Promo - muss möglischst euprhorisch und salbungsvoll sein. Dabei - denkt sich der Schelm in mir - hätten die das gar nicht nötig. Ihre Musik hat genau diesen Touch, der interessierte potentielle Hörer in ihren Bann zu ziehen vermag. Die trashige Stimme, das mitschwingende dunkle und ständig wie eine Gewitterwolke drohende Element, das der Band nach 25 Jahren und sechs Alben eigen ist, und die oft aufreizend als Gegenpol inszenierte Jahrmarktmusik geben dem ganzen einen unverwechselbaren Charakter. Zwischen Saloon und Irrenhaus führt man sich die 13 Songs vom titelgebenden "Black Moose" bis zum abschliessenden "Appenzeller Tanz" zu Gemüte und wird dabei schon auch von den Songcollagen heraus gefordert. Manchmal driftet das Ganze ein bisschen stark ins Hörspiel-Theater ab und man fragt sich, ob das noch was wird. Um dann aber gleich wieder verwundert irgendwelchen Lauten zu lauschen wie den unvermittelt auf- und abtauchenden Dudelsäcken im Skit "Good Luck". Viele der Songs beziehen ihre Spannung aus der Wirkung der dunklen Stimme und daneben sehr spärlicher Instrumentierung, wie etwa in der Ballade "I¨m so lonesome I could cry". In einer Rock'n'Roll-Welt, in der sich jeder zumeist als Bad Boy hinstellen muss, sind die Dead Brothers für mich eine genauso experimentelle wie trashige Band mit heissem Punk-Appeal, die zwischen Blue-Grass, Rockabilly und bluesigem Western-Rock alles beherrscht, was es braucht, um den Hörer auch nach der langen Zeit ihrer Existenz auf einen abwechslungsreichen und ohrenöffnenden Trip mitzunehmen.

B72 (AT)
Der Sound und die Auswahl der Songs auf „Black Moose" schaffen eine z.T. mystische Atmosphäre, trotz des vermehrten Einsatzes treibender Rhythmen... Der für die DEAD BROTHERS ureigene Death Blues, der von je her tief durch die Seele ging, paart sich mit einer rauen wie auch herzlichen Attitüde aus Folk-Musik, psychotischem Punk, Bluegrass der zu Blackgrass wird Rock'n'Roll und Welt-Musik. Und es entsteht wieder diese typische DEAD BROTHERS Romantik: Friedrich Nietzsche, mittelamerikanische Revolutionäre und der Teufel persönlich trinken gefährlich harten Schnaps. Gespannt sein darf man auf die bevorstehenden Konzerte. Banjo, Violine, die alte Hopf Gitarre mit dem für die 60er typischen Twang, wie auch Tuba, diverse Percussion Instrumente für die Rhythmussektion und einiges mehr wird sich auf der Bühne finden. Das Publikum, welches sich oft aus Blues-Freaks, Rock'n'Rollern, Punks Folk- und Welt-Musik und noch ganz anderem Klientel zusammensetzt, wird sich auf eine dramatische Reise durch die musikalische Welt der DEAD BROTHERS begeben

NO DEPRESSION (UK)
The Dead Brothers are one of those diverse and highly original bands one comes across too rarely in today's music. This, along with the fact that they have only released six albums in the last 14 years, makes them quite valuable to music enthusiasts the world over, especially those whose tastes lay a good distance outside of the mainstream. Black Moose, the Dead Brothers' brand new 13-song album on Voodoo Rhythm Records certainly goes toward proving this even more. And like the band's previous releases, Black Moose doesn't disappoint. Nor does it just expand upon their already well-established sound; it forges new roads through the strange musical wildernesses and mad wastelands of death blues, funeral trash, gypsy-folk, dark roots, outsider rock and roll, and... well, that inimitable thing that belongs solely to the Dead Brothers and can only be labeled as such.  The album opens with the title track. "Black Moose" is an arrangement of strings, jaw harp, tuba, and percussion over which frontman Alain Croubalian sings. It takes the listener on a journey through the dark history of man and the affliction of the human condition with which he has always been plagued to one degree or another. These are all significant events passing with one constant: a black presence casting its substantial shadow over it all. "Dark Night," which would probably appeal to fans of Peter Murphy's Carver Combo, has a slow gypsy folk and apocalyptic tango feel to it, marked by the sulfur stink of hellfire and what the vocals refer to as "the dark night of the soul." "I'm So Lonesome I Could Cry" is a sparse acoustic song that reminds me somewhat of Those Poor Bastards. "Black Train" is a roosty song built on rockabilly done Dead Brothers style. And "Ship of Fools" is an atmospheric piece in the dawn of the album, where Dead Alain sings as it floats on to its destination.
Black Moose, the follow-up to the Dead Brothers 2010 album 5th Sin-Phonie, lies at the crossroads where poetry and philosophy intersect, and where a number of other things meet -- superstition and fact, the natural and supernatural, darkness and light, intellect and emotion, the lamb and the lion, the living and the dead. Because of its musical composition and engaging lyrical content, it would not be at all surprising if fans declared it their favorite Dead Brothers release to date.
The Dead Brothers' Black Moose album is available from Voodoo Rhythm Records webstore on LP and CD formats now.
And for those interested in the history of The Dead Brothers, according to the information provided on the band's website it goes something like this: Alain Croubalian first invented the Dead Brothers in his head, after studying death, or more precisely ars moriendi, at the University of Geneva with Professor Jean Ziegler. He then staged a singing doctor selling drugs in cafes and telling the story of the blues standing on the bar. A band appeared the first time in 1993 and played only gospel songs, those sung by Elvis, at the Usine in Geneva. Soon two tubas where main feature with founding member Jean-Philippe Geiser playing Bo Diddley beats on his big horn. Dead Alain then started a circus. The Electric Circus with Alain Meyer, where musicians replaced animals and jugglers (they're cheaper). They travelled Europe with 25 different bands including Reverend Beatman, Bob Log III, T-Model Ford, Withman Mc Gowan and Al Comet three years in a row. The first Dead Brothers drummer had a ladybug disguise (Axel from the band Tulip aus Hamburg) and a dark young lady, a black haired gothic guitar player called Barbara, strumming along (from Last Torridas' fame).
More than 20 ex-members have been Dead Brothers over the last 10 years: Fred Schmutz, Jean-Philippe Geiser, Barbara Bagnoud, Olli Franz, Julien Israelian, Zoe Capon, Axel Jansen, Holger Steen, Resli Burri, Jean-Jacques Pedretti, Alain Porchet, Christoph Gantert, Pierre Omer, Delaney Davidson, Yves Massy, Marcel Salesse, Morback, Denis Schuler, Matthias Lincke, Alain Meyer, Christoph Marti and the one and only dj Scratchy as last minute banjo invitee...This Dead Brothers Kapelle has, since then, taken many forms: A mega combo with three tubas, 9 other horns and a dead Brother puppet dancing, an folk guitar symphony orchestra, a primitive banjo and accordion duo that sounded like shit, ten members reproducing Kurt Weill's arrangements of Brechts' 3 Penny Opera at the Basler Opera, three old acoustic Armenians sitting on chairs, a summer piano cabaret band with slide guitar and fiddle... you never know how they're about to pop up...

DER HOERSPIEGEL (DE)
Schon beim Betrachten des psychedelischen Covers wird der Hörer eingestimmt auf das, was die Formation ‚The Dead Brothers' an den Start bringt. Mit 13 Songs, die keinem musikalischen Genre wirklich klar zugeordnet werden können, geht es an den Start. Nicht zuortenbar ist hier allerdings nur dann richtig, wenn man nicht die lange Umschreibung der CD-Info nimmt. Dort heist es: ‚The Dead Brothers have created a whole new world of Dark Country Blues Swiss Psycho Folk with Oriental Deadly Strings and Rotten Back Pipes'. Tja, und genau so klingt das Album den auch. Vielschichtig, zuweilen tanzbar, beim letzten Stück ‚Appenzeller Tanz' mit deutlich volksmusikalischem Potential, das auch anderweitig durchklingt.
Ein Album, das man einfach mal hören muss, um es zu entdecken.